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CHRISTOPHER CARDOZO FINE ART

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CONTEMPORARY ARCHIVAL PRINTS

 

Mastered from vintage, original source materials, these contemporary fine art photographs are individually produced to emulate the texture and color of the original Curtis photogravures. Four sizes available, prices starting at $185.

Qahatika Girl, 1907 

$185.00  $1,250.00

Curtis’s minimal composition emphasizes this girl’s dark eyes, openness, and direct gaze.  The Qahatika lived in the Arizona desert environment which was amazing to Curtis: “One traversing this region would have cause to wonder how a human being could wrest from so barren a land the necessities of life.”  The Qahatika had a powerful connection with their homeland.  When they were asked why they did not move to river valleys, where living would be easier, they would reply “Our home is the best.”

Available in 11 x 14″, 16 x 20″, 20 x 24″ and 30 x 40″.

Canyon De Chelly, 1904 

$185.00  $1,250.00

Canyon de Chelly (pronounced “de chay”, after the Navaho “Ta She”) was one of the most sacred places for the Navaho and remains so to this day. It is located in Northeastern Arizona in the heart of Navaho country. The insignificance of man relative to nature is clearly illustrated through the sheer size (approximately 1,000 feet high) of enduring cliff formations that surround the riders. Canyon de Chelly is widely considered to be one of Curtis’ most important and powerful images.  A personal favorite of Curtis, he printed it in at least four different photographic processes.

Available in 11 x 14″, 16 x 20″, 20 x 24″ and 30 x 40″.

 

Tapa–Antelope Water,  1905

$185.00  $1,250.00

A stunning portrait of a young man from the Taos Pueblo, in northern New Mexico. This simple, white cotton wrap was worn for many years as the traditional dress for men in the Taos Pueblo.

Available in 11 x 14″, 16 x 20″, 20 x 24″ and 30 x 40″.

An Oasis In The Badlands – Sioux, 1905

$185.00  $1,250.00

This classic Curtis image was made in the heart of South Dakota’s Badlands. The subject is the sub-chief Red Hawk from the Oglala tribe, who was born 1854 and fought with Crazy Horse in 1865 in his first war party against U.S. army troops. He was a fierce warrior and ultimately engaged in 20 battles, including the Custer fight in 1876. This lyrical image is widely considered to be Curtis’ most important and beautiful peopled landscape of the Great Plains. Curtis loved the visual and metaphorical qualities of water as an aesthetic element. The compelling composition and subject matter make this one of Curtis’ most sought after and beautiful images.

Available in 11 x 14″, 16 x 20″, 20 x 24″ and 30 x 40″

Joseph–Nez Perce, 1903


Hienmot Tooyalakekt

$185.00  $1,250.00

Chief Joseph of the Nez Percé is widely considered to be one of the most important tribal leaders of the 19th century. He became close friends with Edward Curtis and this friendship was critical to Curtis’ later success in gaining the trust of numerous other tribes. Joseph’s pride, nobility and tragic experiences that he and his people suffered are all evident on his face. After eluding the U.S. Calvary for nearly two years he was finally subdued and proclaimed the words that became famous: “I will fight no more forever…”

Available in 11 x 14″, 16 x 20″, 20 x 24″ and 30 x 40″

Kutenai Duck Hunter, 1910 

$185.00  $1,250.00

The “Kutenai Duck Hunter” is one of Curtis’ most beautiful, tranquil, and compelling images. The beautiful light, idyllic subject matter, and elegant composition all combine to make this a truly iconic image. This photograph was taken on Flathead Lake in Northern Montana, one of the purest large bodies of water in America. The Kutenai were semi-nomadic and occupied portions of southeastern British Columbia, northern Idaho, and northwestern Montana, moving seasonally to follow food sources. The Kutenai usually crafted their canoes of pine bark, but as illustrated here, occasionally made canoes of fresh elk hides stretched over a framework of fir strips.

Available in 11 x 14″, 16 x 20″, 20 x 24″ and 30 x 40″.

 

Country Of The Kutenai, 1910

$185.00  $1,250.00

Excerpt from the original narrative by Edward Curtis:
“The Kutenai occupied portions of the southeastern British Columbia, northern Idaho, and northwestern Montana. In this region of blue, mountain lakes and majestic rivers, they very naturally made use of canoes. The commoner form was the pine-bark craft still to be observed among the Kalispel, but occasionally they made canoes of the form here illustrated, by stretching fresh elk-hides over a framework of fir strips or tough saplings. The one seen in the picture is a canvas-covered specimen found on the shore of Flathead Lake in 1909.”

Available in 11 x 14″, 16 x 20″, 20 x 24″ and 30 x 40″.

Bow River – Blackfoot, 1926  

$185.00  $1,250.00

Curtis featured the stunning scenery of The Bow River as the backdrop for this image. Beginning in the Rocky Mountains, the Bow River winds through the Alberta foothills onto the prairies, where it meets the Oldman River. The two then form the South Saskatchewan River and ultimately flow through the Nelson River into Hudson Bay.

The Blackfoot Tribe made varied use of the river for sustenance before European settlers arrived, such as using its valleys in their buffalo hunt. The name Bow refers to the reeds that grew along its banks and were used by native people to make bows. The Blackfoot language name for the river is Makhabn, meaning “river where bow reeds grow”.

Available in 11 x 14″, 16 x 20″, 20 x 24″ and 30 x 40″.