Coups Well-Known – Apsaroke

Coups Well-Known – Apsaroke

$5,500.00

Description

The Crow are also called the Apsáalooke, Absaroka, or Apsaroke. Historically, they lived in the Yellowstone River Valley. A Siouan tribe, they lived around the head waters of the upper Mississippi River in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. Later, the Crow moved to the Devil’s Lake region of North Dakota, before moving westward. Settling in Montana, the tribe split two divisions, called the Mountain Crow and the River Crow.

Like many other Plains Indians, the Crow traditionally lived in teepees, though theirs were often larger than the ones of other tribes. Constructed of buffalo skins and wooden poles, flying from the poles were not scalps, but strips of red cloth. The Crow were described as a wandering tribe of hunters and skillful horsemen. They had more horses than any other plains tribe, numbering some 10,000 in mid 1800’s and more than 40,000 by the beginning of the 20th century.

CCI-9401
Photogravure on Japanese Vellum
John Andrew & Son
Portfolio V, Plate 144


NEGATIVE DATE: 1908
PRINT DATE: 1908

PRINT SIZE: 22" x 18"     55.88 x 45.72 cm
IMAGE SIZE: 15.75" x 10.25"     40.01 x 26.04 cm

TRIBE: Apsaroke (Crow)
PRINT QUALITY: Excellent
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Description

The Crow are also called the Apsáalooke, Absaroka, or Apsaroke. Historically, they lived in the Yellowstone River Valley. A Siouan tribe, they lived around the head waters of the upper Mississippi River in northern Minnesota and Wisconsin. Later, the Crow moved to the Devil’s Lake region of North Dakota, before moving westward. Settling in Montana, the tribe split two divisions, called the Mountain Crow and the River Crow.

Like many other Plains Indians, the Crow traditionally lived in teepees, though theirs were often larger than the ones of other tribes. Constructed of buffalo skins and wooden poles, flying from the poles were not scalps, but strips of red cloth. The Crow were described as a wandering tribe of hunters and skillful horsemen. They had more horses than any other plains tribe, numbering some 10,000 in mid 1800’s and more than 40,000 by the beginning of the 20th century.